Practice

Conditions for Practice

It is vital that you have a place of privacy and solitude where you will not be disturbed by distractions, outside stimuli or other people trying to make contact with you, and where you will not be self-conscious about anything that goes on in your meditation. Your meditation room should be free of obstacles with space for movement so that you feel free to allow movement to take place should it present itself.

Although your initiation will initially have you sitting up straight, your sadhana should not to be limited to the idea of “sitting” for meditation if shakti determines otherwise. It is good to have a mat on the floor for this practice. It is not important that you only sit, not lie down or stand up, not fall asleep, vocalize, move, etc. There are no rules during your sadhana. You are free.

If your present situation does not meet this criteria, just do the best you can and work towards improving your conditions

Any compatible practices that you may now be doing can continue at other times, although you may find that they come up in the practice of Sahaja Yoga on their own, in their own way. Because this can be confusing and create doubts, it may be prudent to abandon other meditation practices.

The following link will take you to an earlier blog that describes some of the conditions for practice as set forth in ancient mystical writings. As you read, you must ask yourself what the purpose of the instruction is and how that can be achieved in our modern, western world.

Sanctuary

Length of Sessions

You will need one hour each day. If you can’t find at least an hour a day for God, this sadhana is probably not of sufficient interest to you to produce any results. If you are serious and eager to make progress, two consecutive hours is best.

Finding two consecutive hours a day may be difficult for those who have jobs and families, even if there is genuine interest. If this is you, stick to your hour diligently until you can extend the time when you are ready. To extend the length of your practice sessions, you might try an hour at two different periods of the day until you can work out a way to put them together into one session in order to prevent interruption of your daily sadhana. The sooner you can do this, the sooner the sadhana will work its magic and give you results that will make getting yourself into your meditation room tantalizing and easy.

Next week, “Great Expectations.”

Love,
Durga Ma
durgama.com

List of installments on Sahaja Yoga

Shaktipat Diksha

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5 thoughts on “Practice

  1. I have a question that still actually haunts me sometimes: I stick to one hour so far, sometimes hour-and-a-half of sadhana. The way I do it is this way: I first have a “period of preparation”. I usually start with prayer, sometimes with gentle stretching before prayer. I pray from my heart, but I usually do begin with some well known prayer first, like Asatoma Sadgamaya… or Lord’s Prayer, or similar… I may also chant, or do mantra if feel drawn too, almost always Om Namah Shivaya Mantra… After praying and talking to God put me into meditative mood, I start pranayama, always alternate nostril breathing. Sometimes I do a definite number of cycles, usually ten, and sometimes I do pranayama until I either feel either that the energy started awakening in my body, or until I feel tired of it… And then I do the “peak prayer”: I speak to God and say that I totally surrender this body, mind, feelings and my very soul to God, and – let they will be done, not mine! And that is when I, actually, touch with my finger the alarm clock nearby, which is set to ring exactly in 60 minutes, before I totally let go and get lost in the sadhana. So, if my “preparatory practices” took me, let’s say, 30 minutes, together with 60 minutes dedicated exclusively only to surrender, in total it would be an hour and a half. So my question is: was this, what I described, one-hour sadhana, or one-hour-and-a-half sadhana? Should I count only this period which was dedicated exclusively and only to full and total surrender of body/mind/feelings, or should I count the whole period which involves preparatory practices, and, yes, let us not forget about 15 minutes afterwards, which I spend usually just lying there and slowly coming back to usual routine of will and living? Yes, before I leave the room I spend some time chanting. Actually, all of this could sometimes take me almost as long as two hours, although the period of full surrender was only 60 minutes. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you, dear Ma. However, I apologize, I must repeat my question: if my “preparatory practices” took me, let’s say, 30 minutes, then together with 60 minutes dedicated exclusively only to surrender, in total it would be an hour and a half. So my question is: was this one-hour sadhana, or one-hour-and-a-half sadhana? I am asking because I want to understand what do you mean exactly when you say “do one hour”, or “do two hours of sadhana”. Thank you.

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  2. Pingback: Shaktipat Initiation and Kundalini | Mystical Tidbits

  3. Pingback: Great Expectations | Mystical Tidbits

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