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Abandonment of Attachments -Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2: 48

All action occurs in nature, but you are not nature. What you really are does nothing. Trick question: If what you are does nothing, how can you achieve your aims? 

48
Having abandoned attachments, indifferent to success or failure, all your actions are performed absorbed in Yoga, Winner of Wealth. It is said that indifference is Yoga.

Yoga = Union

When through indifference to success or failure attachments are abandoned, you become absorbed in Yoga and all actions are Yoga. When absorbed in Yoga, actions that occur are not yours because you have no connection with anything but Yoga and are naturally indifferent.

Note the payoff here: Krishna (God) has called Arjuna (You) “Winner of Wealth”.

Abandonment of attachments and indifference to success or failure. Abandonment of attachments means you give up holding on to something. In this case, you are abandoning holding on to concerns about successful or failed outcomes—you give up holding on to something being the way you want it to be (success), and are not upset if it turns out the way you don’t want it to be (failure)—you are indifferent to the outcome. Attachment cannot survive in the presence of indifference.

Indifference = Yoga
Abandonment of attachments to outcomes
= surrendering yourself to God in meditation
= Yoga

By applying this principle to your everyday life, you will find that your endeavors are automatically more successful. When you truly and finally give up on something you want, it is free to come to you. When you apply it to your meditation, success is inevitable.

All your actions are performed absorbed in Yoga. ‘Absorbed in Yoga’ means ‘fully occupied with union’. This describes Surrender Meditation. Non-attachment and indifference to outcomes led us to this Yoga in the first place, and every action that occurs is now automatically performed freely and spontaneously due to being fully occupied with Yoga (union).

Indifference is Yoga.  In Surrender Meditation, you are indifferent: you are surrendered to the Divine. You are not trying to meditate a certain way, to make anything happen, to stop anything from happening, or to get any certain result, so your meditation is automatically successful whether it looks that way to you or not.

The only difficulty here is that we come into this practice with preconceived ideas. Preconceived ideas become expectations, and expectations become attachments—we want things to turn out a certain way because we think they should. But for surrender sadhana to work, we take what we get. To us, “indifference to success or failure” means that we do not have any investment in what our meditation experience will be like, whether our meditation will produce the results the we think it should, or not. We abandon ‘shoulds’.

Surrender Meditation is the excellent practice of giving up both attachments and motives, for a specific time period, in a proper and conducive setting, and the meditation is spontaneous. For those of us who practice this radical form of meditation, our meditation is our ‘lab’ where we discover for ourselves that we are not the cause of action, that this was the Truth all along, that what we really are does nothing and never did.

All action occurs in nature.
You are not nature.

Answer to the Trick Question: When you can give up attachments to outcomes, success will come. Things may not look quite how you thought they would, but they will be better than you expected. Indifference to success or failure is the key to reaching your aims and goals.

Namaste (I bow to the Divine You),
Durga Ma


TERMS OF USE AND SHARING:

This post and text is original research material and is copyrighted. You are allowed to share this material for personal, non-commercial and educational use with the proper citations, references and links / tags back to my website. Clicking ´Share´ on FB or ´Reblog´ on WordPress would be most appropriate.Please obtain written permission from Anandi first if you want to use this material on your workshop, blog, organization, webpage, book, seminar or for any commercial purpose. All information provided, be it through sessions conducted or this post is non-liable and is not intended to replace professional legal, medical, psychological, psychiatric and/or financial counsel. How you choose to act on this information is up to your own free will and is entirely your responsibility.

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Your Unlimited Power, Joy, and the Truth About Happiness -Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2:44

** Remote Shaktipat initiation into Surrender Meditation is being offered on January 1st, 2021 on the anniversary of Durga Ma’s own initiation, given by Anandi, her direct disciple charged to carry on the lineage. To be included in this remote event, please email anandibhgavan@gmail.com with your intentions to be considered no later than December 25th.**

You have unlimited power—you have only to access it. You can afford to be desireless because everything you want is already yours—you have only to realize it. 

44
Being attached to enjoyment and power, the consciousness of the unenlightened is stolen away. They do not have the ability be singularly unwavering and cannot attain samadhi

“Being attached to enjoyment and power.” The purpose of this attachment is to fulfill desires. Attachment is itself a desire, a desire to hold on to something. In this case, one wants to hold on to enjoyment and power. So what does this tell you? This tells you that you must already have enjoyment and power or you couldn’t be concerned about keeping them.

“The consciousness of the unenlightened is stolen away — they do not have the ability to remain unwavering … so they cannot attain samadhi.”  Now we come to the point. ‘Consciousness’ refers to the attention—a flow of consciousness to what the mind is being conscious of. Desires keep the mind extroverted and in constant motion, preventing unwavering attention (stealing it away) and therefore, samadhi.

“Samadhi” — Equanimity, ‘equal-mind’. Remember where this started? With the equalization of opposites. And here is the prize: samadhi, ‘a unified state of mind’, whereby you can discover the real You (Self-realization). But samadhi can only be attained through the meditative state (dhyana) where there is an unwavering, uninterrupted flow of consciousness and life energy in one place for a sufficient length of time.

In addition to stealing the attention away and preventing the very thing we desire most, there is another liability inherent in desire:

Desire is an affirmation of lack.

A desire for something can only exist when there is a belief in the mind that you do not have it. A common technique for alleviating this perceived deficiency is to do positive affirmations, but by doing these affirmations you are strengthening the idea in your mind that you do not have what you want. Desires, especially acting on desires, give energy and strength to the (subconscious) belief of lack. Neither belief of lack nor mental agitation are harmonious with enjoyment and power, or samadhi.

This verse is not trying to make you feel guilty for having desires, for wanting power, for wanting those things in life that make you feel good. That is not its purpose. What it is trying to tell you is that you feel hungry for these things because you know their wonder and worth, and that you can only know this through your own experience.

Desiring something says “I want”, but why would you want something you already have? How could you possibly know what it would be like to have a desire fulfilled if you didn’t already know from your own experience? Chasing desires just drives you around in circles and accomplishes nothing.

Bonus Key

This verse is also giving you the key to reestablishing yourself in your true nature, your real Self. Such a beautiful and blissful state, and you know this, and you are hungry for it. It is not power and pleasure you want, but to reveal the You that is already perfect, powerful, and in-joy.

Namaste — I bow to the divine, powerful and joyous one that You really are,
Durga Ma

** Remote Shaktipat initiation into Surrender Meditation is being offered on January 1st, 2021 on the anniversary of Durga Ma’s own initiation, given by Anandi, her direct disciple charged to carry on the lineage. To be included in this remote event, please email anandibhgavan@gmail.com with your intentions to be considered no later than December 25th.**

 

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TERMS OF USE AND SHARING:

This post and text is original research material and is copyrighted. You are allowed to share this material for personal, non-commercial and educational use with the proper citations, references and links / tags back to my website. Clicking ´Share´ on FB or ´Reblog´ on WordPress would be most appropriate.Please obtain written permission from Anandi first if you want to use this material on your workshop, blog, organization, webpage, book, seminar or for any commercial purpose. All information provided, be it through sessions conducted or this post is non-liable and is not intended to replace professional legal, medical, psychological, psychiatric and/or financial counsel. How you choose to act on this information is up to your own free will and is entirely your responsibility.

Three Kinds of Resolve – Bhagavad Gita, Ch 18, Vs 33-35

Determined

Previously:
Now hear the three kinds of intelligence and resolve, together and separately, according to the gunas, Conqueror of Wealth — Verse 29

Conqueror of Wealth – By calling Arjuna Conqueror of Wealth, Lord Krishna is saying to Arjuna that intelligence and resolve are forms of wealth that he possesses.

Intelligence (buddhi) – intellect, reason, the ability to differentiate, discern and judge. Buddhi is the power of the mind that forms ideas, imaginations, conceptions, and knows how to differentiate and figure things out.

Resolve (dhṛtes) – standing firm in the course of your practice; courageously holding resolute determination without wavering. You don’t quit when the going gets rough, or when you aren’t getting what you think you want.

Resolve

Determination

33 — Sattvic Resolve
That resolve by which the functions of the mind, the vital breath and the senses are held unwaveringly in yoga, is sattvic.

  • Mind (manas) – the part of the mind that receives perceptions.
    • Attention – the flow of consciousness to perceptible ‘objects’.
  • Vital breath (prana) – the Life Energy that keeps you alive.
    • Attention and Life Energy always travel together.
  • The senses (indriyas) – the abilities that you have to hear, see, touch, taste and smell.
  • Held (avyabhicharin, ‘steady’) – withdrawn, stilled and concentrated in one place in the body . When the senses are withdrawn from external objects and steadily concentrated at the throat chakra without wavering, the mind and Prana follow suit. When this is accomplished, one experiences pratyāharā.
  • Yoga (divine union) – the equanimity of samadhi (sameness) and direct experience (experience without any via). Pratyāharā is the turning point of Yoga.
  • In verse 30, we discussed the two fundamental paths (pravṛitti and nivṛitti) in which the first, the use of the will is applied, and in the second it is not. We can look at sattvic resolve either way. This verse is generally translated for the path of the will (pravṛitti marga). Now let’s see what it looks like in terms of nivṛitti marga, the path of non-willful action, surrender to Absolute God:

Determined RenunciateWith the path of the will (pravṛitti marga), to meditate you use your will to (1) withdraw your attention internally, (2) hold your mind still, (3) and hold the Life Energy still.

In the non-willful path (nivṛitti marga), you do none of these. You don’t have to. You have realized through your experience with non-willful meditation that, if you truly surrender yourself to God, God will manage your meditation and take care of all this, and the senses, the mind and Life Energy will spontaneously stop moving.

When this happens you have turned a corner in your meditation. This is known as pratyahara, the magical moment in deep meditation when the door to samadhi opens. In the early stages of samadhi there are journeys filled with unimaginable adventures, places and beings, all wondrous to behold.

  • Samadhi – joining together, uniting (yoga), a unified state of mind, equanimity.

34 — Rajasic Resolve
But the firm hold to duty, desire and wealth, with attachment and desire for the results of actions, is rajasic.

Desire produces willful action. I have said this before, but be reminded that this is not necessarily a bad thing. It is what most people do. It is the norm. Everyone likes to be part of the norm in order to be accepted. But this comes at a cost … you don’t move on to the next phase of life in which your norm becomes the non-willful path of nivṛitti marga. If you do not move on to this, your progress will come to an end. If you do, you will regard your previous phase of pravṛitti marga as a blessing that got you to this place.

I have been accused of being elitist in my teaching of surrender yoga. But it is not a matter of one path being better than the other. It is a matter of one coming after the other, and which is most suitable for each individual according to their personal dharma and their stage of live (see verse 30 for more on this subject). 

35 — Tamasic Resolve
That resolve by which one holds on to the intoxication of imaginings, fears, grief and despair, is tamasic.

Described in this way, tamasic resolve seems to exclude any spiritual path at all. One is encumbered with cravings and sorrows to the point of being so completely distracted by them, that it is almost impossible to see anything else. This is a hard place to be. But one can use imagination to counter fears, sorrows and despair. The problem is that the tamasic person often has little or no contact with others other than those who are also living in this dark place, and so does not make this simple discovery.

A cave for a home is sheer determination!
A cave for a home.

Most people I have come across who are in this bind, cannot allow themselves to get out of it. Just finding a small interlude between traumas is difficult. They are ‘attached’ to this state of darkness. It is ‘who they are’. Identified with this state as who they are, they cannot imagine it changing or disappearing, for this would mean that they would disappear and cease to exist.    

Attachment is not only applicable to desires for likable things, but one may be attached to something not in their best interest and not even realize it. 

Perhaps you have had times like this and can identify with it to some degree. If so, try to imagine what it would be like to live in this state all the time, and allow your empathy to go to these suffering people with the love and compassion they so badly need.

Namaste (I bow to the divine one that you really are),
Durga Ma
durgama.com