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The Dark Hero – Bhagavad Gita 1:7-13

The Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 1, Vs 7-13

ARJUNA’S DEPRESSION & MORE CHARACTERS

Characters:

Duryodhana – King and chief of the Kuru army, the eldest of one hundred brothers. The name means, ‘dirty fighter, wicked, sneaky, a cheat’. He represents the ego.

Drona – The archery guru who taught the art of war to the major players on both sides of the conflict. The name means ‘wooden bucket’ (it is said that he was born outside of the womb in a bucket). He represents the neutral aspects of the mind and its contents (manas), and its ability to judge (buddhi). Drona represents the intellect.

7
Also know, O best of the twice-born, the leaders of our own army. I will name those who are most distinguished that you may recognize them all.

Duryodhana is speaking to his archery guru, Drona, whom he refers to as ‘twice-born’ (brahmin, ‘God-person’), signifying his high standing. Duryodhana now moves from pointing out all those he is up against among his enemies in the previous verses, to noting the warriors fighting on his own side.

8
You [Drona] and Bhishma (the terrible vow), and Karna (having ears), and Kripa (pity) who is victorious in battle, and Ashvatthama (strength of a horse; he is Drona’s son), and Vikama (without passion), and the son of Somadatta (soma-giver),

The terrible vow — celibacy for life.

Somadatta — giver of the nectar (soma) of immortality. Soma is identified with the moon (the pineal gland) which produces (gives) the soma. Somadatta’s son, whose name is Bhurishrava (bhuri – earth, shrava – glory = glorification of the earth, the body), is his progeny, immortality.

9
And many other heroes are here who will risk their lives for me. All of them are armed with many weapons and all are well skilled in war.

These fellows are risking their lives to save the ego (Duryodhana) in order to win the war so ego can maintain control.

10
Inadequate is this army of ours protected by Bhishma (terrible vow), while the army led by Bhima (formidable strength) is indeed adequate for victory.

So the fellows in verse eight who are risking their lives to save the ego may be experts, but in this verse, even though Duryodhana’s forces are greater in number than his enemy, he finds them wanting. However, he has noticed something important: He has identified what is protecting his own army, Bhishma, the ‘terrible vow’, and he has also identified the biggest threat from the enemy army: Bhima, ‘formidable strength’.

11
Therefore, stationed in your respective strategic positions and formations, you must now support and protect Bishma on all fronts!

12
To Duryodhana’s great joy, the old Kuru, the Grandsire [Bishma], powerfully blew his conch horn like the roaring of a lion.

13
Immediately, conches, kettledrums, cymbals, trumpets and horns all sounded simultaneously, with a tremendous uproar.

___________________________

Duryodhana and Drona are Kurus of the lunar race. The Pandavas, their enemy, are of the race of the sun. While it is only natural to see this as the Bad Guys versus the Good Guys, or the Dark Side versus the Light, let us not forget that Krishna (God/Guru), the main speaker and star of the show throughout the Bhagavad Gita, is of the lunar race. Krishna drives Arjuna’s chariot, placing himself in the position of serving Arjuna. In other words, Arjuna has put God in the driver’s seat.

So these two, sun and moon, have come together on the field of dharma, creating a huge tumult with the sounding of their various instruments. This tells us that this epic concerns hatha yoga (sun-moon union) for the purpose of taking back the throne of authority, raja yoga (royal union), and it all begins in earnest with a loud confusion of sound.

We see here that yoga is of two kinds, one leading to the next, and that, even though the players are all well versed in spiritual and religious teachings and practices, this ‘battle’ is really just the beginning.

Contemplate the Sun and the Moon 

SUN

MOON

day

night

light

darkness

visibility

invisibility

obvious

hidden

conscious

sub/un-conscious

manifest

non/un-manifest

seen by means of direct light

seen by means of indirect light

warm

cool

earth

water

star

satellite

central

peripheral

independent

relative

___________________________

For ideas on how to understand these verses and relate them to yourself and your own sadhana, consult the last portion of the previous installment on the Bhagavad Gita, the Song Of God

Namaste,
Durga Ma


TERMS OF USE AND SHARING:

This post and text is original research material and is copyrighted. You are allowed to share this material for personal, non-commercial and educational use with the proper citations, references and links / tags back to my website. Clicking ´Share´ on FB or ´Reblog´ on WordPress would be most appropriate.
Please obtain written permission from Anandi first if you want to use this material on your workshop, blog, organization, webpage, book, seminar or for any commercial purpose. All information provided, be it through sessions conducted or this post is non-liable and is not intended to replace professional legal, medical, psychological, psychiatric and/or financial counsel. How you choose to act on this information is up to your own free will and is entirely your responsibility.

 

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Arjuna’s Depression – Bhagavad Gita 1:1

The Bhagavad Gita – Chapter 1, Vs 1

ARJUNA’S DEPRESSION

1
Dhirtarashtra said:  O Samjaya, about my sons of the field of doers, and the sons of Pandu of the field of dharma, eager to fight, tell me what they are doing.  

Characters:

Dhritarashtra – Dhritarashtra was the blind king. The name means, ‘one whose empire is firmly held’. 

Samjaya – The king’s minister. The name means, ‘victorious’.

What is going on:

A conflict is about to take place on the battlefield. Dhritarashtra, who was king and is blind, is asking his minister, Samjaya, to tell him what is going on between his son’s army and the opposing army. His son leads the armies of the Kurus. The armies of the Pandavas are lined up against him.

Because Dhritarashtra is blind, he tells his minister, Samjaya, who has the power to see at a distance, to tell him what is going on. The result is that we get to listen in as Samjaya reports events to Dhritarashtra. This is the source of a dialogue that makes up the content of the Bhagavad Gita. The dialogue is between Arjuna, one of the Pandavas, and Krishna, Arjuna’s guru and childhood best friend who has come over from the other side to drive Arjuna’s chariot for him. But this is another story.

The Two Fields
The field of dharma (truth, divine law, virtue)¹ and the field of kuru (doership, will, ‘ego’).

Think of ‘field’ as a scope of influence and action. The field of the Pandavas is dharma, Truth. The field of the Kurus² (from, kri, ‘to do’) is doership. These two, Truth and doership, have come together in one place to contend their right to rule the kingdom, thus implying that Truth and doership do not tend to get along well with one another.

What does all this have to do with you? 

As a king, Dhritarashtra represents a ruler. His blindness represents ignorance—he is unenlightened. Because he cannot ‘see’ and must have his minister relate events to him, we draw the obvious conclusion that this indicates perception that is indirect on the part of the unenlightened, whereas the perception of one who ‘sees’ is direct. So we have ‘ignorance’ as ‘ruler’ of the ‘kingdom’.

What rules you and your kingdom? You will find the answer to this question in what you want. Do you want Truth, or do you want to be in control? Do you want Truth to rule, or do you want to do everything yourself? The setup of this story seems to be telling us that there is no middle ground where this is concerned.

The rightful ruler is Truth, dharma.
Doership (will) has usurped the thrown.
A conflict is inevitable.

The conflict between the Kurus and the Pandavas represents a clash of opposing forces that occurs when attempting to right this situation. The clash is the coming together of two opposing energies in the body of the person engaged in this endeavor. This union of sun-energy and moon-energy (ha-tha yoga) in the body³ awakens the evolutionary force (kundalini). Once awake and active, the evolutionary force begins the process of doing what is necessary to correct the situation. This process is explained by Lord Krishna in His dialogue with Arjuna, his devotee, and makes up the content of the Bhagavad Gita (Song of God).

Ignorance, the state of the unenlightened, is indirect perception. Dhritarashtra represents ignorance as the ruler of one’s kingdom—your perception, actions, and life in general. But there is someone with you who perceives directly, and can ‘see’. This individual knows what’s going on, and will tell you everything if you ask. But it will be up to you to understand what is being conveyed to you by this individual … and by this scripture, for it is this individual who is conveying it.

FOOTNOTES:

¹ dharma means law, the true essence of anything, and Truth in the absolute sense, i.e., sanatana dharma, ‘Eternal Truth’.

² The physical place, Kurukshetra, is located north of Delhi near Pranipat.

³ The Kurus are of the race of the Moon, and the Pandavas are of the race of the Sun.

Jaya Bhagavan(Victory to God!)
Durga Ma

** For those who are participating in the Gita studygroup with Anandi, the first Zoom discussion will be help Sunday, June 28th @ 11amEST.  For assistance and questions please email anandibhagavan@gmail.com


TERMS OF USE AND SHARING:

This post and text is original research material and is copyrighted. You are allowed to share this material for personal, non-commercial and educational use with the proper citations, references and links / tags back to my website. Clicking ´Share´ on FB or ´Reblog´ on WordPress would be most appropriate.
Please obtain written permission from Anandi first if you want to use this material on your workshop, blog, organization, webpage, book, seminar or for any commercial purpose. All information provided, be it through sessions conducted or this post is non-liable and is not intended to replace professional legal, medical, psychological, psychiatric and/or financial counsel. How you choose to act on this information is up to your own free will and is entirely your responsibility.

Profound Joy and Happiness – Bhagavad Gita, Ch 18, Vs 70-78

Screen Shot 2018-11-28 at 10.14.50 AM

Previously, it was the Greatest Secret that was the subject of verses 70-71. In this translation however, it is the entire Gita that is the subject:

70-71
And one who studies this sacred dialogue of ours, by that one I am loved with the Knowledge Sacrifice.
 One who is faithful and void of ill-will and hears it, certainly becomes liberated and attains the auspicious and happy worlds of the righteous.

  • Studies – studies the Bhagavad Gita, and internalizes it.
  • Faithful – taking action ‘on faith’ until proven. (‘Faith’ is synonymous with ‘discipline’ – going ahead anyway no matter what)
  • Void of ill-will – not deriding it.
  • The righteous – ‘those whose actions are pure’.
  • Pure – auspicious, propitious, pleasant, good, right, virtuous, meritorious, holy, sacred.

Vyasa, the author of the Mahabharata, which includes this Bhagavad Gita, is speaking as Lord Krishna as if He were aware that, many years in the future, there would be people like us reading this Gita and needing to know that we have not been left behind by the passage of time. Truth never changes. The Greatest Secret of the Diamond Shloka, and the entire Bhagavad Gita, are as great and true now as they ever were. And if we proceed with Faith, rather than questioning it, we can become liberated and attain “the auspicious and happy worlds of the righteous.”

One who is faithful and void of ill-will refers to the yogi who has studied this dialogue and has learned this Great Secret directly from the mouth of his guru, just as Arjuna has. At death, even if he has not yet mastered it, he may nevertheless become liberated and attain the happy and auspicious world of those who have.

72
Have you heard me with concentrated mind, Arjuna? Have your ignorance and delusion been destroyed, O Winner of Victory? 

73
Arjuna spoke:
Infallible One, by your Grace, my confusion is gone and memory regained. Unchanging One, I stand with doubt dispelled, and I shall do whatever you say.

  • Unchanging – Absolute

In the beginning of the Gita, Arjuna spent the first chapter railing at the idea of engaging in this battle, but now that he understands what is really going on, he is inspired and committed to follow his guru’s promptings.

Now we hear from Samjaya, minister to the present king, who has been narrating all this to him (and us):

74
Samjaya speaks:
Thus have I heard this dialogue between Krishna, the Son of Vasudeva, and Arjuna, the noble hearted son of Pritha, so glorious that my hair is standing on end.

Samjay's Joy

Samjaya’s Joy

Samjaya is the blind king’s minister. He is narrating to him this dialogue between Lord Krishna and Arjuna as we listen in. Samjaya (‘victorious’) is using his power of divine sight to perceive it from afar, where Krishna and Arjuna are standing between the two armies before the battle begins. He has heard the key teaching of the Diamond Shloka and has discovered that, by having heard and understood it, it can propel him directly to liberation, and he is electrified by the prospect.

75
By the grace of Vyasa, I have heard this supreme and holy secret of Yoga from Shri Krishna, speaking directly, before my very eyes. 

Samjaya is saying that he has heard this supreme secret of Yoga directly from the Lord of Yoga himself, Lord Krishna. And that it is by the grace of Vyasa, who is the author of this story, that he has been able to do so. He goes on to say…..

76-77
O King, as I continue to recall this most profound and holy dialogue between Lord Krishna and Arjuna, I rejoice again and again. And remembering that astonishing and wonderful form of Lord Krishna, I am greatly amazed and I rejoice yet again and again.

Samjaya did not miss the part where Lord Krishna said that one who is faithful and void of ill-will and hears this, also becomes liberated and attains auspicious and happy worlds. So he is filled not only by the wonder of the whole conversation, but also, by having learned this Great Secret, that he, too, will be liberated and find Eternal Happiness.

The astonishing and wonderful form of Lord Krishna refers to Krishna’s Cosmic Form in chapter eleven.

78
Where there is Krishna, Lord of Yoga, and where there is Arjuna, the Great Archer, there will also be honor, success, prosperity and unending Goodness. Of this I am certain.

Krishna, who represents God and Guru, knows Yoga (uniting). Arjuna, a warrior, represents the disciple who is brave in the midst of much as yet unproven, and seemingly risky, undertakings. But he only needed this guidance from Lord Krishna to go forward no matter what. This is the definition of ‘discipline’. By such discipline, he is certain to reach the Highest Goal — by the Highest Knowledge, the Highest Action, and the Highest Devotion. And so can you.


Read The Exquisite Beauty of Surrender Yoga and receive a gift from me to you.


Namaste (I bow to the divine one that you really are),
Durga Ma
durgama.com