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Abandonment of Attachments -Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2: 48

All action occurs in nature, but you are not nature. What you really are does nothing. Trick question: If what you are does nothing, how can you achieve your aims? 

48
Having abandoned attachments, indifferent to success or failure, all your actions are performed absorbed in Yoga, Winner of Wealth. It is said that indifference is Yoga.

Yoga = Union

When through indifference to success or failure attachments are abandoned, you become absorbed in Yoga and all actions are Yoga. When absorbed in Yoga, actions that occur are not yours because you have no connection with anything but Yoga and are naturally indifferent.

Note the payoff here: Krishna (God) has called Arjuna (You) “Winner of Wealth”.

Abandonment of attachments and indifference to success or failure. Abandonment of attachments means you give up holding on to something. In this case, you are abandoning holding on to concerns about successful or failed outcomes—you give up holding on to something being the way you want it to be (success), and are not upset if it turns out the way you don’t want it to be (failure)—you are indifferent to the outcome. Attachment cannot survive in the presence of indifference.

Indifference = Yoga
Abandonment of attachments to outcomes
= surrendering yourself to God in meditation
= Yoga

By applying this principle to your everyday life, you will find that your endeavors are automatically more successful. When you truly and finally give up on something you want, it is free to come to you. When you apply it to your meditation, success is inevitable.

All your actions are performed absorbed in Yoga. ‘Absorbed in Yoga’ means ‘fully occupied with union’. This describes Surrender Meditation. Non-attachment and indifference to outcomes led us to this Yoga in the first place, and every action that occurs is now automatically performed freely and spontaneously due to being fully occupied with Yoga (union).

Indifference is Yoga.  In Surrender Meditation, you are indifferent: you are surrendered to the Divine. You are not trying to meditate a certain way, to make anything happen, to stop anything from happening, or to get any certain result, so your meditation is automatically successful whether it looks that way to you or not.

The only difficulty here is that we come into this practice with preconceived ideas. Preconceived ideas become expectations, and expectations become attachments—we want things to turn out a certain way because we think they should. But for surrender sadhana to work, we take what we get. To us, “indifference to success or failure” means that we do not have any investment in what our meditation experience will be like, whether our meditation will produce the results the we think it should, or not. We abandon ‘shoulds’.

Surrender Meditation is the excellent practice of giving up both attachments and motives, for a specific time period, in a proper and conducive setting, and the meditation is spontaneous. For those of us who practice this radical form of meditation, our meditation is our ‘lab’ where we discover for ourselves that we are not the cause of action, that this was the Truth all along, that what we really are does nothing and never did.

All action occurs in nature.
You are not nature.

Answer to the Trick Question: When you can give up attachments to outcomes, success will come. Things may not look quite how you thought they would, but they will be better than you expected. Indifference to success or failure is the key to reaching your aims and goals.

Namaste (I bow to the Divine You),
Durga Ma


TERMS OF USE AND SHARING:

This post and text is original research material and is copyrighted. You are allowed to share this material for personal, non-commercial and educational use with the proper citations, references and links / tags back to my website. Clicking ´Share´ on FB or ´Reblog´ on WordPress would be most appropriate.Please obtain written permission from Anandi first if you want to use this material on your workshop, blog, organization, webpage, book, seminar or for any commercial purpose. All information provided, be it through sessions conducted or this post is non-liable and is not intended to replace professional legal, medical, psychological, psychiatric and/or financial counsel. How you choose to act on this information is up to your own free will and is entirely your responsibility.

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Transcend Materialism and Be Self-Realized – Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 2:45-46

When you de-identify with nature, the Real You becomes apparent—you come awake to your true Self. 

45
The subject of the Vedas is the material world of the three gunas*. You must rise above this and become Self-realized Arjuna, transcending the gunas, ever of kind disposition, and free of duality and concern for safety.

Think of this as the firm resolve to fearlessly practice Yoga (previous verses), transcend materialism, and become Self-realized.

“Self-realized” — You know who and what you really are. God is constantly in your thoughts. Truth/God constantly pervades your awareness. God/Truth is all you think about. When thoughts of ordinary things arise, they arise within this context. You put this first before all else. Everything is all about God/Truth and your spiritual practice for maintaining union with That.

“Transcending the three gunas* — Getting past being identified with nature. Through meditation (dhyana), one ultimately becomes indifferent to the interactions of the gunas and can remain steadily in union. It is possible to learn how to behave in such a way as to portray this state to the satisfaction of onlookers, but this is not transcendence but very accomplished behavior. To transcend the three gunas of nature is to become truly free of ‘worldliness’. Meditation will naturally move one in this direction over time.

* The Three Gunas — The three qualities, or modes, of nature: Tamas - Fixed, slow-moving. Darkness, ignorance, mindlessness, laziness. Couch potato. Rajas - Intense, fast-moving. Passionate, desirous, lustful. Stimulus junkie. Sattvas - Smooth-flowing, easy-moving. Tranquil, clear, subtle. Easy-going.

One guna is not better than the other. The gunas are simply fundamental characteristics of nature. They affect each other like weather fronts affect climate.

“Ever of kind disposition” — Continuously established in kindness you are harmless, honest, self-honest and at peace. These are qualities of the Real You.

“Free of duality” — Free of concern for the effects of pairs of opposites. Opposites and their effects have no influence. You are truly independent, pure and content. These are qualities of the Real You.

“Free of concern for safety” — When God/Truth is ever present in your awareness, this takes care of itself. You cease to be concerned about acquiring or keeping things in order to feel safe and secure. This doesn’t mean you won’t have or keep things, but that you are not attached to them, distracted by having or getting them, or worrying about keeping them. You are non-possessive and non-attached, and the issue of security is moot—you are invulnerable. These are qualities of the Real You.

46
As much value as there is in a well when water is flooding on every side, so much is the value in all the Vedas for a God-person who Knows.

“The Vedas” — Consider this to be a reference to religious doctrines, dogmas, and belief-systems.

“A God-person who Knows” — A person of Wisdom, someone who is enlightened as to the Truth of how things really are. This is a quality of the Real You, a reference to what we have been taught up to this point being absorbed, understood and applied.

Remember my saying, ‘All action occurs in nature’? All action is the result of the interactions of the three gunas. That’s it. That’s all. Get this and your karma is over.

Namaste — I bow to the divine, perfect one that You really are,
Durga Ma


TERMS OF USE AND SHARING:

This post and text is original research material and is copyrighted. You are allowed to share this material for personal, non-commercial and educational use with the proper citations, references and links / tags back to my website. Clicking ´Share´ on FB or ´Reblog´ on WordPress would be most appropriate.Please obtain written permission from Anandi first if you want to use this material on your workshop, blog, organization, webpage, book, seminar or for any commercial purpose. All information provided, be it through sessions conducted or this post is non-liable and is not intended to replace professional legal, medical, psychological, psychiatric and/or financial counsel. How you choose to act on this information is up to your own free will and is entirely your responsibility.

Perform Prescribed Actions with Abandon – Bhagavad Gita, Ch 18, Vs 3-11

Abandon self-interest

Previously:
2  According to the wise, the abandonment of desire-motivated actions is called renunciation, and the abandonment of the results of actions is called abandonment.

3 – 4
Some men of wisdom say that action itself is to be abandoned and bodes evil, and others say that acts of sacrifice, giving and austerities are not to be abandoned. Now hear My conclusion concerning abandonment, Best of Bharatas. There are three kinds.

  • Austerities (tapas) – melting away impurities.
  • Evil – sinful, faulty, erroneous, dangerous.
  • Sinful – acts that are contrary to the Truth of what You really are.
  • Best of the Bharatas – best seeker of Knowledge of Truth.

“Some men of wisdom say that action itself is to be abandoned”
Example: Some ‘men of wisdom’
teach static meditation — to meditate, you must not move a muscle or have a thought in your mind. 

5-6
Acts of sacrifice, austerity (tapas) and giving should not be abandoned but practiced. They are the purifiers of those who are wise. However, these actions are to be performed with abandonment of attachment to their results. This is my definite conclusion.

Abandonment is understood to mean non-attachment to the outcomes of actions. Abandonment can be practiced in life in general, but it is required for entering into Surrender Meditation. Attachments are automatically abandoned the minute you turn everything over to Absolute God in meditation, even though they may resurface afterward. This is self evident, for one is not truly surrendered if there are strings attached. By practicing this meditation, attachments naturally fade away easily and painlessly.

Three Forms of Abandonment

Acts of sacrifice, austerity and giving however, are not to be abandoned, but are meant to be done. They are forms of Abandonment because one abandons consideration of personal gain with their performance. When this is observed in meditation it is called ‘sacrifice’.

Relinquishment

Sacrifice – yajña. The wise know that sacrifice, austerity (tapas) and giving are not only practices for successful living, but are part and parcel of surrender yoga sadhana as well, for they are present in the surrender of oneself to Absolute God/Truth. Also, for one who understands their meaning, they purify the body, feelings and mind.

Sacrifice also means worship, devotion and offering — offering the surrender of oneself to Absolute God in meditation. The Sanskrit syllables of ‘sacrifice’ give us clues: ya, (who) + jña, (knows). “One who knows,” suggests that there is more to be known than what is apparent.

PurityAusterity – tapas. Tapas means ‘to burn, warm or melt’, and refers to a higher form of purification that is carried out by shakti, prana and kundalini. The instigating force of nature (shakti) kicks off the activities of the Life Force in the body (prana), with the evolutionary force (kundalini) calling the shots.

GivingGiving – dana, means ‘the act of giving’, and also, ‘communion, imparting, and teaching’. When you surrender something to the Divine, you are giving. For this reason, giving is also practiced in the world by selflessly giving to the guru and the poor.

The key to these three practices bringing about purification is found in the “abandonment of attachment to their results.” Once understood, this is easier than it may seem, and a joy to practice.

Action occurs. Results happen.
‘Abandonment’ means that you are not attached to these results of action.

Sacrifice, giving and austerities (tapas) refer to something you have that you give, or sacrifice, to God — you part with what you possess in favor of Absolute God. This generates tapas, the fire (energy) of purification, which is not abandoned, but welcomed.

Desires are inevitable. They are not the culprit.
The culprit is your attachment to them.

Another way to see this is to perform these prescribed actions with abandon. In these, you can act with abandon. If you do this, you won’t give a hoot about what you’re going to get out of it, and your sacrifices, austerities and gifts will be the very best: sattvic (smooth, easy-going and pleasant).

7
Renunciation of enjoined actions is improper. Abandoning such actions through delusion is said to be tamasic.

  • Tamasic – dark, unenlightened, unintelligent, and contrary to the Truth of You.
  • Enjoined action – required actions, i.e., spiritual practices such as sacrifice, giving and austerities in everyday life, and surrender of oneself (body, mind and feelings) in meditation

8
One who abandons action merely because it is difficult, or because of fear of pain or discomfort, performs rajasic abandonment. One will not obtain results from this kind of abandonment.

  • Rajasic is passionate, intense, fast.

9
Prescribed action properly performed while relinquishing attachment to its fruits, is considered to be sattvic.

  • Sattvaic actions are easy, smooth, pleasant, mild, and in alignment with Absolute God/Truth and the Real You. 

10
The wise abandoner endowed with sattva, his doubts concerning action having been cut away, neither dislikes disagreeable action nor seeks agreeable action.

11
It is indeed impossible for embodied beings to abandon actions entirely. So one who abandons the fruits of action, is called an abandoner.

Once you grasp the message, you will practice surrender to Absolute God with abandon, and be done with acting out of self-interest.

Namaste (I bow to the divine one that you really are),
Durga Ma
durgama.com